Friday, November 24, 2017

RBC economist: Inequality drives the economy and politics

2016 has been a tumultuous year. Democracy itself has faced a crisis, and the political establishment has been shaken. Voters in the U.S. and the U.K. expressed their desire for change, regardless of the form this change is going to take and at times fueled by xenophobic sentiment.

A tale of two countries

2016 heralded unprecedented shifts in our global political landscape. The watershed moment, it can be argued, was Britain’s vote to abandon the 23-year-old European Union. As news reports of this historic vote surfaced, shock waves ricocheted across global financial markets, sending all the major indices into tailspins.

Wall Street starts 2017 with tailwind

Thanks to a series of new record highs, the leading U.S. stock market indices had a very successful end of the year. The recent momentum also puts the market in a good position heading into 2017.

After Brexit vote, pound resumes its long-term decline

The British Brexit vote has caught many market participants off guard, particularly in the foreign exchange market.

US elections: What really matters from an investor’s perspective

The U.S. presidential election not only produces controversial headlines in the media, but also raises concerns for many investors.

Emigration and immigration

During the height of the Cold War, the Berlin Wall was built to keep the citizens of East Germany from leaving. We cheered as it and similar barriers to emigration from the Soviet to the Free World fell in 1989. But the right to leave awkwardly confronts the right of countries to choose who may or may not enter. The right to leave has little meaning if you have no place to go.

Physical security: Think global, act local

Stuart Bostock’s Security Centre Ltd. has protected a dozen high-profile personalities, and continues to prosper in the face of global threats – bombings, personal attacks and multiple casualties.

Overseas territories fight reputation in ownership debate

There has been a flurry of activity over the past six months in the halls of the Financial Services Ministry in Cayman and its counterparts in the United Kingdom and the other overseas territories on how and when to share company ownership information with law enforcement and tax authorities overseas.

Shipping industry not buoyed by low fuel costs

In February, the Baltic Dry Index, which assesses the prices of moving major raw materials by sea, dropped to an all-time low of 290 points.

Bermuda: An island divided over immigration reform

Linking arms in front of Bermuda’s parliament building, a large group of committed protesters earlier this year shut down debate on a controversial immigration reform bill that promised to offer “pathways to status” for expatriates in the territory.

Effects of Brexit on overseas territories uncertain

On June 23, a referendum will be held in the U.K. for voters to decide whether the country should leave or remain in the European Union.

Presidential elections: Do they affect performance of economy, financial markets?

Elections are, by their nature, uncertain, which is why they are held in the first place.

Eric Bush: Cayman’s man in London

Over the next three years, Cayman Islands residents are going to be hearing a lot more about what’s going on in the United Kingdom.
The $600,000 loan agreement between Forward Sports and the Cayman Islands Football Association was ostensibly concluded to assist with the construction of the National Training Center. - Photo: Matt Lamers

Loans, gifts and graft: CIFA and CONCACAF’s Panama connections

A Panamanian company set up by Canover Watson that was allegedly used to receive a $1.1 million bribe payment from Traffic Sports to Jeffrey Webb is the same entity that had a controversial $600,000 loan agreement with the Cayman Islands Football Association, documents reveal.
A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in a junkyard in Joao Pessoa, Brazil, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus. - Photo: AP

Zika virus spawns economic dangers through the Americas

The spread of the Zika virus, a growing medical threat through much of the Americas, demands “urgent action” from regional governments to help control the potential economic damage an epidemic could cause, according to the World Bank and other institutions.
The Banking Banana Skins 2015 poll

Bankers fear failure of global economic recovery

There is growing unease in the banking industry that a possible failure of the global economic recovery will hurt the still fragile banking system.
IMF growth forecast

Economy is ‘uncertain, uneven and underwhelming’

Craig Wright, chief economist at Royal Bank of Canada, admits he is slightly more optimistic than the consensus in his economic outlook. Yet he...
A tender ferries passengers to a cruise ship in George Town harbor. Plans for a cruise berthing dock in Grand Cayman mean tenders would no longer be required. – PHOTO: CHRIS COURT

Asia’s economic climb presents scant threat to Caribbean tourism

Frank Bentayou“Concern in Caribbean is unfounded.”That’s the pithy first line of an email Stewart Chiron sent during a mid-trip pause in Dallas last week...

16 predictions for 2016-2021

Last year was a roller coaster of a year for analysts of global economics and politics. Here is the forecast for 2106 and beyond.

Board Apprentice launches in Cayman

A U.K.-based nonprofit striving to widen the pool of board-ready candidates to increase diversity on boards globally launches in Cayman.
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